Syllabus

This course highlights two regions of Latin America that scholarship could focus more on, the hispanophone Caribbean and the Urban Latinx experience. The class will teach and encourage performance analytics, as well focus on the structural poverty that produced such musics. At a time of the creation of Spanish Trap, the success of newer popular artists like Cardi B, and the #MeToo movement, the discussion of Latinas’ positioning and agency in diasporic musics becomes even more crucial.

Course Readings

Week 1:Knowing our Roots: Histories of Reggaeton and Hip Hop

  • Marshall, Wayne. “From Música Negra to Reggaeton Latino: The Cultural Politics of Nation, Migration, and Commercialization.” In Reggaeton, edited by Wayne Marshall, Raquel Z. Rivera, and Deborah Pacini Hernandez, 19–50. Duke University Press, 2009.
  • Flores, Juan. From Bomba to Hip-Hop: Puerto Rican Culture and Latino Identity. Popular Cultures, Everyday Lives. New York: Columbia University Press, 2000. “6. Puerto Rocks: Rap, Roots, and Amnesia”

Week 2 “The Man”: Colonialism, Blackness, and Slavery

  • Godreau, Isar. Scripts of Blackness: Race, Cultural Nationalism, and U.S. Colonialism in Puerto Rico. Global Studies of the United States. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2015. “Chapter 2: Slavery and the Politics of Erasure”
  • Smith, Christen A. Afro-Paradise: Blackness, Violence, and Performance in Brazil. Urbana ; Chicago ; Springfield: University of Illinois Press, 2016. “Chapter 1: Where the Whip Tears Flesh”
  • McKittrick, Katherine. Demonic Grounds: Black Women and the Cartographies of Struggle. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2006. “Introduction”
  • Thomas, Deborah A. Modern Blackness: Nationalism, Globalization, and the Politics of Culture in Jamaica. Latin America Otherwise. Durham: Duke University Press, 2004. “Modern Blackness or Theoretical Trippin on Black Vernacular Culture”
  • Stoler, Ann Laura. Carnal Knowledge and Imperial Power: Race and the Intimate in Colonial Rule. Berkeley: University of California Press, 2002. “Carnal knowledge and imperial power: gender and morality in the making of race”

Week 3 Check the Method/Theory: Theoretical and Methodological frameworks

  • hooks, b. (1999). “Eating the Other” found in Hesse-Biber, S. N., Gilmartin, C. K., & Lydenberg, R. (1999). Feminist approaches to theory and methodology: An interdisciplinary reader. New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Marsh, C. (2012). Hip Hop as Methodology: Ways of Knowing. Canadian Journal Of Communication, 37(1), 193-203.
  • Kun, Josh. Audiotopia: Music, Race, and America. Berkeley, Calif.: University of California Press, 2005. “Introduction: Strangers among Sounds”
  • Brennan, Denise. What’s Love Got to Do with It? Transnational Desires and Sex Tourism in the Dominican Republic. Latin America Otherwise. Durham: Duke University Press, 2004. “Introduction”
  • Lorde, Audre. “Uses of the Erotic: The Erotic as Power.” In Sister Outsider: Essays and Speeches, 53–59. Berkeley, Calif.: Crossing Press, 1984.

Week 4 :Mami Motif in Hip Hop ( and Reggaeton)

  • Cruz-Janzen, Marta. “Latinegras: Desired Women—Undesirable Mothers, Daughters, Sisters, and Wives.” In The Afro-Latin@ Reader, edited by Miriam Jiménez Román and Juan Flores, 282–95, 2010.
  • Rojas, Viviana. Mendible, Myra, ed. From Bananas to Buttocks: The Latina Body in Popular Film and Culture. 1st ed. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2007. “Chusmas, Chismes, y Escándalos: Latinas Talk Back to El Show de Cristina and Laura en América”
  • Maldonado, Melanie. “Bomba Triguena: Diluted Culture and (Loss of ) Female Agency in AfroPuerto Rican Music and Dance Performance.” Caribbean without Borders: Literature, Language, and Culture, 2009, 95–117.
  • Perry, I. (2005). “Hip Hop’s Mama.” Found in Prophets of the Hood. Durham, NC: Duke University Press.
  • 2011.  Rivera, Raquel Z.  “Butta Pecan Mamis: Chocolaté Calienté.” Pp. 419-434 in That’s the Joint!: The Hip-Hop Studies Reader, ed. Murray Forman and Mark Anthony Neal. New York, NY: Routledge.
  • Beltran, M. (2002). The Hollywood Latina Body as Site of Social Sturggle: Media Constructions of Stardom and Jennifer Lopez’s” Cross-over Butt”. Quarterly Review of Film and Video, 19(1), 71-86.
  • Balaji, Murali. 2010. “Vixen Resistin’: Redefining Black Womanhood in Hip-Hop Music Videos”. Journal of Black Studies. 41(1):5-20.

Week 5:In Yo Face: The Erotic and Perreo

  • Allen, Jafari. ¡Venceremos? Duke University Press Books, 2011. “The Erotics and Politics of Self-making” 74
  • “‘Mom Be Pimpin’: Exploring the mother-whore dichotomy in hip hop” found in Motapanyane, M. (2012). Mothering in Hip-Hop Culture: representation and experience. Bradford, Ont: Demeter.
  • Baker, Geoffery. Buena Vista in the Club. Duke University Press Books, 2011. “The Revolution of the Body: Reggaetón and the Politics of Dancing 108”
  • Felix Jiménez, “Wrapped in Foil: Glory at 12 Words a Minute,” In Reggaeton,

edited by Wayne Marshall, Raquel Z. Rivera, and Deborah Pacini Hernandez, 71–79. Duke University Press, 2009.

  • Baez, Jill. “En Mi Imperio: Competing Discourses of Agency in Ivy Queen’s Reggaeton.” Centro Journal 18, no. 11 (Fall 2006): 63–81.
  • Rivera-Rideau, Petra R. Remixing Reggaetón: The Cultural Politics of Race in Puerto Rico. Durham: Duke University Press, 2015. “Perils of Perreo”

Week 6: Dique? Rewind!: Continuing Racial Histories and Experiences

  • Radano,Ronald and Philip V.Bohlman. “Introduction: Music and Race, Their Past, Their Presence.” In Music and the Racial Imagination,ed. Radano and Bohlman, 1253. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2000.
  • Flores, Juan. “Creolite in the ‘Hood: Diaspora as Source and Challenge.” Centro Journal 16, no. 2 (Fall 2004): 282–93.
  • Boudreault-Fournier. “Positioning the New Reggaeto´n Stars in Cuba:From Home-Based Recording Studios to Alternative Narratives.” The Journal of Latin American and Caribbean Anthropology 13, no. 2 (2008): 336–60.
  • Floyd, Samuel A. The Power of Black Music: Interpreting Its History from Africa to the United States. New York: Oxford University Press, 1995. “Syncretization and Synthesis: Folk and Written Traditions”
  • Samponaro, Philip. “‘Oye Mi Canto’ (‘Listen to My Song’): The History and Politics of Reggaeton.” Popular Music and Society 32, no. 4 (September 21, 2009): 489–506.
  • Baker, Ejima. “Can BET Make You Black? Remixing and Reshaping Latin@s on Black Entertainment Television.” In The Afro-Latin@ Reader, edited by Miriam Jiménez Román and Juan Flores, 358–63, 2010.

Week 7: Power to the People: Reggaeton and Hip Hop as Resistance

  • Perry, Marc D. Negro Soy Yo: Hip Hop and Raced Citizenship in Neoliberal Cuba. Refiguring American Music. Durham: Duke University Press, 2016. “2. Hip Hop Cubano: An Emergent Site of Black Life” “4. Critical Self-Fashionings and Their Gendering”
  • Allen, Jafari. ¡Venceremos? Duke University Press Books, 2011. “Friendship as a Mode of Survival”
  • Quintero, Sofia. “Divas Don’t Yield.” In The Afro-Latin@ Reader, edited by Miriam Jiménez Román and Juan Flores, 411–14. Duke University Press, 2010.
  • Peoples, Whitney. “Under Construction”

Identifying Foundations of Hip-Hop

Feminism and Exploring Bridges between

Black Second-Wave and Hip-Hop Feminisms. Project MUSE.

  • Mark Anthony Neal, “I’ll be Nina Simone Defecating on Your Microphone,” in That’s the Joint!: The Hip Hop Studies Reader, New York: Routledge, 2004, pp. 247-250.

Week 8: Queer representation in Hip Hop and Reggaeton

  • Lara, Ana. “Uncovering Mirrors: Afro-Latina Lesbian Subjects.” In The Afro-Latin@ Reader, edited by Miriam Jiménez Román and Juan Flores, 298–313, 2010.
  • Oware, M. (2011). Brotherly Love: Homosociality and Black Masculinity in Gangsta Rap Music. Journal Of African American Studies, 15(1), 22-39.
  • Savannah Shange (2014) A king named Nicki: strategic queerness and the black femmecee, Women & Performance: a journal of feminist theory, 24:1, 29-45,
  • Lane, Nikki. “Black Women Queering the Mic: Missy Elliot Disturbing the Boundaries of Racialized Sexuality and Gender.” Journal of Homosexuality 58 (2011): 775-792.
  • Clay, Andreana .“‘I used to be scared of the dick’: Queer women of color and hiphop masculinity.” In Homegirls Make Some Noise, 148-166.
  • Brown, Joshua R. 2011. “No Homo”. Journal of Homosexuality. 58(3): 299-314.
  • Hill, Marc Lamont. 2009. “Scared Straight:Hip-Hop,Outing,and the Pedagogy of Queerness”. Review of Education, Pedagogy and Cultural Studies. 31(1):29-54.
  • Walcott, Rinaldo. (2013) “Boyfriends with Clits and Girlfriends with Dicks: Hip Hop’s Queer Future.” Palimpsest: A Journal on Women, Gender, and the Black International, 2:2, vol.2 pp. 168 – 173.

Week 9: Bendicion: Entering (other) Spaces, Crossovers, Appropriation, & Authenticity

  • Fuchs, Cynthia. Mendible, Myra, ed. From Bananas to Buttocks: The Latina Body in

Popular Film and Culture. 1st ed. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2007. “There’s My

Territory”: Shakira Crossing Over ”

  • Davila, Jose. “You Got Your Reggaetón in My Hip-Hop: Crunkiao and ‘Spanish Music’ in the Miami Urban Scene.” In Reggaeton, edited by Wayne Marshall, Raquel Z. Rivera, and Deborah Pacini Hernandez, 200–213. Duke University Press, 2009.
  • Yousman, B. (2003). Blackophilia and Blackophobia: White Youth, the Consumption of Rap Music, and White Supremacy. Communication Theory, 13(4).
  • Gilroy, Paul. “Sounds Authentic: Black Music, Ethnicity, and the Challenge of a ‘Changing’ Same.” Black Music Research Journal 11, no. 2 (Autumn 1991): 111–36.
  • Raquel Z. Rivera, “Will the Real Blanquitos Please Stand Up?: Class, Race and Reggaeton, www.reggaetonica.blogspot.com
  • Radano, Ronald. “On Ownership and Value.” Black Music Research Journal 30, no. 2 (Fall 2010): 363–70.

Week 11: Panlatinidad

  • Flores, Juan. From Bomba to Hip-Hop: Puerto Rican Culture and Latino Identity. Popular Cultures, Everyday Lives. New York: Columbia University Press, 2000. “Pan-Latino/Trans-Latino: Puerto Ricans in the “New Nueva York’”
  • Rivera, Raquel Z. “Ghettocentricity, Blackness, and Pan-Latinidad.” In The Afro-Latin@ Reader, edited by Miriam Jiménez Román and Juan Flores, 373–86, 2010.
  • McFarland, Pancho. “Chicano Rap Roots: Afro-Mexico and Black-Brown Cultural Exchange.” In The Afro-Latin@ Reader, edited by Miriam Jiménez Román and Juan Flores, 387–95, 2010.
  • LeBron, Marisol. “‘Con Un Flow Natural’: Sonic Affinities and Reggaeton Nationalism.” Women & Performance:A Journal of Feminist Theory 21, no. 2 (2011): 219–33.
  • Marshall, Wayne. “Placing Panama in the Reggaeton Narrative: Editor’s Notes.” In Reggaeton, edited by Wayne Marshall, Raquel Z. Rivera, and Deborah Pacini Hernandez, 71–79. Duke University Press, 2009.

Week 12: We Gon Wreck it: Hip Hop & Reggaeton & Antiblackness

  • Roth-Gordon, Jennifer. “Racial Malleability and the Sensory Regime of Politically Conscious Brazilian Hip Hop.” The Journal of Latin American and Caribbean Anthropology 18, no. 2 (2013): 294–313.
  • Chang, Jeff, D. J. Kool Herc, Mirron Willis, and Tantor Media. Can’t Stop Won’t Stop: A History of the Hip-Hop Generation. Old Saybrook, Conn.: Tantor Media, 2016. “What We Got To Say: Black Suburbia, Segregation and Utopia in the late 1980s
  • Flores, Carlos. “Desde El Mero Medio: Race Discrimination within the Latino Community.” In The Afro-Latin@ Reader, edited by Miriam Jiménez Román and Juan Flores, 323–25, 2010.
  • Vielka Cecilia, Hoy. “Negotiating among Invisibilities: Tales of Afro-Latinidades in the United States.” In The Afro-Latin@ Reader, edited by Miriam Jiménez Román and Juan Flores, 426–30. Duke University Press, 2010.

Week 13: N Palabras

  • Torres-Saillant, Silvio. “Divisible Blackness: Reflections on Heterogeneity and Racial Identity.” In The Afro-Latin@ Reader, edited by Miriam Jiménez Román and Juan Flores, 453–66. Duke University Press, 2010.
  • Darity Jr, William, Jason Dietrich, and Darrick Hamilton. “Bleach in the Rainbow: Latino Ethnicity and Preferences for Whiteness.” In The Afro-Latin@ Reader, edited by Miriam Jiménez Román and Juan Flores, 485–98. Duke University Press, 2010.
  • Guzman, Pablo “Yoruba”. Ed. Jiménez Román, Miriam, and Juan Flores. The Afro-Latin@ Reader: History and Culture in the United States. Durham [NC: Duke University Press, 2010. “Before People Called Me a Spic, They Called Me a Nigger 235”
  • Felipe, Luciano. “Excerpt from Jíbaro, My Pretty Nigger.” In The Afro-Latin@ Reader, edited by Miriam Jiménez Román and Juan Flores, 244, 2010.

Perdomo, Willie. “Nigger-Reecan Blues.” In The Afro-Latin@ Reader, edited by Miriam Jiménez Román and Juan Flores, 467. Duke University Press, 2010.

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